Wednesday, July 26, 2017

West Toronto Diamond Grade Separation

West Toronto Diamond 2014 Fly-Under Goes into Service

The last Visited to the site was on December 20, 2015

The final, chapter will not be written for the West Toronto Diamond until June 28, 2014, but the most critical important milestone for the rebuilding of the Georgetown-Kitchener corridor under way since 2002 took place Friday May 23 at 7:04:41 pm, when the last GO Transit Train bound for Bramalea cross CP Rail grade mainlines at the West Toronto Diamond for the very last time.

At 8:00 pm, track crews got to work at both ends of the new West Toronto Diamond grade separation fly under tunnel east of the current Weston Sub own by Metrolinx to connect the existing track to the new track 1 already in place in the new tunnel as well part of the corridor.

This put the end of 132 years of trains crossing this diamond with the final chapter to be written for it when it is remove in late June or early July when the bridge for the 2nd fly under that will carry CP twin mainlines as well provision for twin tracks for future tracks for GO Transit Cross Town line is moved into position.

This will allow both GO Transit and VIA Rail to run trains freely without having to get permission from CP Rail to cross their tracks or be delay by their trains.

Up until 1879, Grand Trunk Railway (GTR), along with Toronto Grey and Bruce Railway (TGBR), were the only railways in this area running to/from Toronto when the Credit Valley Railway (CVR) begin running trains from Toronto to Galt. This line is still known as the Galt Sub carrying GO Transit Milton trains. The GTR line was known as the Brampton Sub until the 1960s when it became the Weston Sub by CN Rail who now own it.

In 1882 the Ontario & Quebec Railway (OQ) was building their line across the northern part of Toronto to gain access to it. To do so, OQ needed to gain access to the Village of Lambton Mills to the west of GTR and TGBR lines for their new yard and maintenance facility and this required diamonds so all the railways could cross each others tracks. It also required someone to man them and to give permission to the various roads to cross safely over these diamonds. By 1884, Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) would gain control of CVR, OQ and TGBR to form part of their current system. Over time, technology changed to the point that there was no need for someone to man these diamonds anymore.

Over the years, the diamond has under gone many make over to the point that only the twin Weston Sub were crossing CP tracks as of 2010. With increasing of more trains on both lines as well the forecast of more trains on the Weston Sub for the Union Pearson line, something had to happen to deal with the issue of the diamond.

Since the Weston Sub was only seeing GO and VIA Rail short trains these days, it was decided to build a fly under tunnel that required a 2% grade between Dupont Road and St Clair Ave easier than CP Rail .007% grade that didn't have enough room to do so as well CP did not wanting to do it.

The 5:55 am from Bramalea to Union Station was to be the first train to have the honour of use the new fly under for the first time, but due a signals failure as well a GO train testing the fly under was stuck by the signals failure as well, that train was cancel.

[Photo Image MPI MP40PH-3C 662 On point of a Southbound GO train Going into the New Fly Under]
MPI MP40PH-3C 662 Descending into the New Fly Under as the First Official Revenue Train to use it

 

The Mount. Pleasant Train had the honour when it start the decent into the fly under at 6:50 am. It was late by 10 minutes at this time caused by the signals failure.

This is a photo image of {MPI MP40PH-3C 618 GO Train coming out of the new fly under}

 

Work started on the same day to removed the existing single track for the exWeston Sub no longer in service on both sides of the diamonds as well at Old West Road to allow excavation to get underway for the second tunnel, since the retaining walls had already been built for it. Once the excavation was low enough, the 2 bridges were to be built in place so they could be pushed into position in June.

Once that is done, the local resident will not hear the clickety-clack, thumb de thumb sound as trains cross the diamonds anymore. CP will be able to run their trains though the area faster.

Once the double twin track fly under is in operation by the end of 2014, GO Transit will be able to start to add more trains as well All Day service if they have the engineers. Since it takes 2 years of railroad experience before being allow under Transport Canada and the USA Federal Railway Administration regulation compare to Europe Union that requires only 26 to 41 weeks for someone to be an engineer. GO Transit must carry a large work force over 2 year plus so they can an engineer.


Final Day For The Crossing

 

The final, chapter will not be written for the West Toronto Diamond until June 28, 2014, but the most critical important milestone for the rebuilding of the Georgetown-Kitchener corridor under way since 2002 took place Friday May 23 at 7:04:41 pm, when the last GO Transit Train bound for Bramalea cross CP Rail grade mainlines at the West Toronto Diamond for the very last time.

At 8:00 pm, track crews got to work at both ends of the new West Toronto Diamond grade separation fly under tunnel east of the current Weston Sub own by Metrolinx to connect the existing track to the new track 1 already in place in the new tunnel as well part of the corridor.

This put the end of 132 years of trains crossing this diamond with the final chapter to be written for it when it is remove in late June or early July when the bridge for the 2nd fly under that will carry CP twin mainlines as well provision for twin tracks for future tracks for GO Transit Cross Town line is moved into position.

This will allow both GO Transit and VIA Rail to run trains freely without having to get permission from CP Rail to cross their tracks or be delay by their trains.

Up until 1879, Grand Trunk Railway (GTR), along with Toronto Grey and Bruce Railway (TGBR), were the only railways in this area running to/from Toronto when the Credit Valley Railway (CVR) begin running trains from Toronto to Galt. This line is still known as the Galt Sub carrying GO Transit Milton trains. The GTR line was known as the Brampton Sub until the 1960s when it became the Weston Sub by CN Rail who now own it.

In 1882 the Ontario & Quebec Railway (OQ) was building their line across the northern part of Toronto to gain access to it. To do so, OQ needed to gain access to the Village of Lambton Mills to the west of GTR and TGBR lines for their new yard and maintenance facility and this required diamonds so all the railways could cross each other’s tracks. It also required someone to man them and to give permission to the various roads to cross safely over these diamonds. By 1884, Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) would gain control of CVR, OQ and TGBR to form part of their current system. Over time, technology changed to the point that there was no need for someone to man these diamonds anymore.

Over the years, the diamond has under gone many make over to the point that only the twin Weston Sub were crossing CP tracks as of 2010. With increasing of more trains on both lines as well the forecast of more trains on the Weston Sub for the Union Pearson line, something had to happen to deal with the issue of the diamond.

Since the Weston Sub was only seeing GO and VIA Rail short trains these days, it was decided to build a fly under tunnel that required a 2% grade between Dupont Road and St Clair Ave easier than CP Rail .007% grade that didn't have enough room to do so as well CP did not wanting to do it.

The 5:55 am from Bramalea to Union Station was to be the first train to have the honour of use the new fly under for the first time, but due a signals failure as well a GO train testing the fly under was stuck by the signals failure as well, that train was cancel.

[Photo Image MPI MP40PH-3C 662 On point of a Southbound GO train Going into the New Fly Under]
MPI MP40PH-3C 662 Descending into the New Fly Under as the First Official Revenue Train to use it

 

The Mount. Pleasant Train had the honour when it start the decent into the fly under at 6:50 am. It was late by 10 minutes at this time caused by the signals failure.

This is a photo image of {MPI MP40PH-3C 618 GO Train coming out of the new fly under}
MPI MP40PH-3C 618 GO Train coming out of the new fly under

 

Work started on the same day to removed the existing single track for the exWeston Sub no longer in service on both sides of the diamonds as well at Old West Road to allow excavation to get underway for the second tunnel, since the retaining walls had already been built for it. Once the excavation was low enough, the 2 bridges were to be built in place so they could be pushed into position in June.

Once that is done, the local resident will not hear the clickety-clack, thumb de thumb sound as trains cross the diamonds anymore. CP will be able to run their trains though the area faster.

Once the double twin track fly under is in operation by the end of 2014, GO Transit will be able to start to add more trains as well All Day service if they have the engineers. Since it takes 2 years of railroad experience before being allow under Transport Canada and the USA Federal Railway Administration regulation compare to Europe Union that requires only 26 to 41 weeks for someone to be an engineer. GO Transit must carry a large work force over 2 year plus so they can an engineer.